Wednesday, October 21, 2009



"Nature is, above all, profligate. Don't believe them when they tell you how economical and thrifty nature is, whose leaves return to the soil. Wouldn't it be cheaper to leave them on the tree in the first place? This deciduous business alone is a radical scheme, the brainchild of a deranged manic-depressive with limitless capital. Extravagance! Nature will try anything once ... This is a spendthrift economy; though nothing is lost, all is spent."

from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

4 comments:

mossy said...

That's absolutely one of my favourite books. I've spammed the opening paragraph to dozens of people!

I've been stuck in a rut lately reading mostly apocalyptic fiction. Definitely not good to read too much of this stuff in a row. I think it might to time to re-read Pilgrim...

eepy

Allison said...

That's a great passage. I never thought of deciduous trees in that way.

Marnie said...

I wasn't too sure about the book in the beginning, but by the end I was a fan. I'm envious of Dillard's ability to sit by her creek for long periods of time without being eaten alive by ants! On the other hand, the muskrats here are much less skittish than the ones she stalked. I didn't know how good I had it!

Avery said...

Thanks for sharing this quote! I'm glad you like the book:) I will keep this in my mind as I watch the leaves disappear off the trees this fall (and as I rake them up!!)

Avery